Our Research Team

team members
  • Screen shot 2012-06-13 at 4.58.31 PM

    Nan Hauser

    President CCRC
    SPWRC Exec. Committee

    Nan Hauser is the President and Director of the Center for Cetacean Research and Conservation. She resides in Rarotonga, Cook Islands, where she researches population identity, population abundance, acoustics, genetics, behavior, migration and navigation of cetaceans. She is a Trustee for Save Our Oceans Charitable Trust in Rarotonga. She satellite tags whales to gather information on their migration over long distances. She has taught on a global level for the Dolphin Research Center, Whale Conservation Institute (now Ocean Alliance), The New England Dolphin Outreach Project, Cook Islands Whale Research Project and other non-profit organizations. As a registered nurse, Nan practices and teaches medicine on the outer islands of the Cooks, where she also teaches in the local schools. She holds a US Coastguard 100 tonne Captain’s license. Nan serves on the Executive Committee, and is a scientific researcher for the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium. She played a major role in the creation of a 2 million square kilometer whale sanctuary in the EEZ of the Cook Islands, and built a whale education center (now known as the “Whale & Wildlife Centre”) in Rarotonga. In the U.S., she has served on the Board of the Gulf of Maine Aquarium. Nan has been the focus of many Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, National Geographic, ARTE, and Smithsonian films. She received a “Lifetime Achievement Award” in NYC along with Sylvia Earle of Mission Blue and Khalid bin Sultan of Living Oceans in November of 2014. 

  • alyssa stoller

    Alyssa Stoller

    Research Assistant

    Alyssa is currently a student at Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA pursuing a degree in environmental science with a marine ecology emphasis. Alyssa hopes to gain further knowledge and skills to become a successful scientist in the field to protect the ocean, and specifically whales through her studies. Alyssa aspires to share this future research with the public through education, writing, and film. During July through mid October of 2014, Alyssa was a research assistant for the humpback whale field season in Rarotonga. Alyssa was able to gain immense knowledge during the field season, and feels very lucky to be able to continue to be a part of such incredible research. Before going to Rarotonga, Alyssa volunteered with the Soundwatch Program based out of San Juan Island off the Washington state coast May of 2013 and 2014. The program included regulating and educating recreational and whale watching boaters to keep a safe distance from the resident orca populations, as well as other marine wildlife.

  • natalie barefoot

    Natalie Barefoot

    Research Assistant & Cetacean Law Expert

    Natalie Barefoot is the Executive Director of Cet Law, Inc., a not-for-profit organisation that works in partnership globally with non-profits, business and government to translate sound science and best practices into practical legal solutions that protect whales, dolphins and porpoises, and their habitats (www.cetaceanlaw.org). Natalie has worked with Whale Research since 2014 both on the boat as a Research Assistant and on land providing technical legal and project management support. Prior to Cet Law, Natalie worked as an attorney for the United Nations Environment Programme and Hogan Lovells, LLP. She has also worked in international development at Pact, Inc. in Harare, Zimbabwe and Washington, DC, and is a PADI dive master, a AIDA2 Freediver, a witty conversationalist and a lover of everything ocean.

  • abagail robinson

    Abigail Robinson

    Research Assistant & Drone Operator

    Abigail is currently studying a Bachelor of Applied Science, and is majoring in Biodiversity Management at Unitec, Auckland. She has a certificate of Animal Management, and was an animal specialist at Crane Lake camp in West Stockbridge Massachussetts, where she was in charge of forty animals of fifteen different species. Abigails hard-working, and self-disciplined personality has led her to do amazing work such as being part of a production line testing crystals in Auckland New Zealand, and working at a construction site as an engineers project assitant. In 2014, Abigail became a research assistant on the Cook Islands, working for Nan Hauser studying humpbacks during the winter mating season, which is July through October. Abigail was in charge of operating the drone, verbally recording observations, collecting and labeling DNA, driving the boat, filming and photographing whales both above and below the water, as she is a certified open water scuba diver.

  • dana bloch

    Dana Bloch

    Research Assistant

    Dana is an undergraduate student at Bowdoin College, majoring in Earth and Oceanographic Science and minoring in Biology. She is particularly interested in the intersection of Oceanography, Marine Biology and Environmental Studies, and how this knowledge can enhance ocean education, protection and conservation efforts.Dana’s passion for whales started when she was very young, and was also inspired by the pilot whale vertebrae she received from her grandfather on her seventh birthday – from a skeleton she has since reconstructed. She spent previous summers teaching sailing on Cape Cod Bay, and as a Marine Mammal and Avian Observer for the Maine Coastal Mapping Initiative.

  • ali haible

    Ali Haible Thorp

    Research Assistant
  • cameron thorp

    Cameron Thorp

    Research Assistant
  • jody hartman

    Jody Hartman

    Research Assistant

    Nan Hauser’s son, Jody, specializes in media creation with a focus in videography and graphic design. An adventurous childhood in pursuit of whales, extensive travel, and thrilling nature encounters led him down the path of creatively capturing and sharing his life experiences.

    After many years in Boston working in the travel industry, and as a graphic designer/marketing coordinator for the New England Patriots, Jody has returned to his home-state of Maine. He currently works in marketing, and remains an integral part of the Whale Research team.

    Something different: His dog, Stella, is more famous than her owner will ever be. Check out this video with almost 8 million hits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfw69p_rvU4

  • katherine tison

    Katherine Tison

    Research Assistant

    I am graduating with honors from the University of Florida in spring 2016 with a B.S. in Marine Sciences and a minor in UF Teach, an integrative STEM education program. My interdisciplinary science background has trained me in chemistry, biology, physics, ecology, and geology. As a research assistant in the College of Geology, I have worked in a variety of different labs including a clean lab, x-ray diffraction lab, and a mass-spec lab. My honors thesis is investigating the major assumption of oceanic uniformity of uranium isotopic activity as it relates to U-series dating and climate change research. As a student, undergraduate teaching assistant, and club leader of the UF Teach program, I have taught at 4 local middle and high schools in Gainesville, FL and furthered my teaching abilities through internships at the Florida Aquarium in Tampa, FL in the husbandry department (2013) and the education department (2014) via 2 NOYCE internship awards. I spent the summer of 2015 working for SOAR Florida, an wilderness adventure camp for children with ADD/ADHD and learning disabilities based in Scout Key of the Florida Keys and the Dry Tortugas National Park. I additionally have an interest in environmental law and policy, and have a strong passion for communicating science and environmentalism. I also took many creative writing classes and enjoy poetry and fiction. In my free time, I enjoy reading, writing, painting, camping, competitive sports, ministry, and anything in, on, or near the ocean.

  • john martin

    John Martin

    Surface and Underwater Videographer

    Award-winning Director of Photography, Producer, Director. Seasoned field explorer, cameraman, photographer, and traveller to over fifty countries to deliver compelling and behaviour-changing digital media and awareness campaigns – focused on biodiversity conservation for the well-being of humanity. Feet in the mud, head in the sky approach – absolute attention to detail, up-to-date technical knowledge and understanding of media industry, sense of brand. Ability to enter remote and extreme ecosystems and remain in-situ for prolonged periods of isolation. Master of public interaction who shakes friendly hands and builds relationships in order to achieve goals.

    At Conservation International (CI) since the year 2000, John has filmed and photographed nature & wildlife, marine & terrestrial ecosystems, heads of state & indigenous leaders, and produced award-winning videos in over 48 countries for CI. His work has ranged from filming gorillas in the Democratic Republic of Congo to co-producing a National Geographic short documentary on endangered frogs to directing an award-winning aerial film over Colombia’s threatened páramos.

    Besides his passion for film and photography, John is also an avid sculptor, chef, and takes any opportunity to dive underwater. Born in Colombia, John is fluent in five languages.

  • travis horton

    Travis Horton

    Scientific Collaborator

    Travis Horton is an Associate Professor of Earth System Science in the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Canterbury (Christchurch, New Zealand). Travis‘s primary research interest is determining how whales and other animals navigate during long-distance migration. As an interdisciplinary scientist with classical training in geology, geochemistry and geophysics, Travis brings a unique perspective to the >3000 year old mystery: How do animals navigate? At the 2015 Marine Mammal Society Conference held in San Francisco, Travis used CCRC’s humpback whale satellite tracks to demonstrate many of the remarkable non-random patterns present in humpback whale movement data in geophysical representations of space and time. Recognition of such repeated and reproducible patterns across populations gives us the opportunity to anticipate when and where whales will be located, a tremendous asset to whale conservation and sustainable development of the world oceans. Born in New England, U.S.A. with deep family roots in the former whaling capital of the world, Nantucket Island, Travis is excited to keep pushing the research envelope of cetacean conservation and marine protection.

     

  • riley elliot

    Riley Elliot

    Scientific Collaborator

    As a surfer, spear-fisherman, free-diver, and scuba diver, Riley a.k.a the Shark Man, has experienced the rarest and scariest of all natural encounters; a shark attack. He grew up in Waikato, surfing Raglan, and summering in the Coromandel. His upbringing was similar to most New Zealanders, his interests focused on nature, knowledge, and adventure. He has been to over 60 countries to surf, dive, or simply experience culture enough to satiate his constant thirst for perspective. A Scarfie life at the University of Otago suited his desires well, with plenty of oppurtunity to surf, study wildlife, and long holidays to travel, along with a world-class education. He ontained a BSc Honors in Zoology, and a Masters in Marine Science with Distinction. After fifteen years spent underwater, and studying dolphins in Fiordlands Doubtful Sound, Riley experienced his first shark attack, by a harmless one-meter school shark. His experience made him question why humans are afraid of sharks, which led him to South Africa on an internship to figure it out. He was invited to stay after his program, and help run the Oceans Research Great White Shark Program. From run-ins with a four meter a Great White Shark jumping into his boat, to free-diving without a cage, fear was transformed to fascination, and the Shark Man was born. Through his PhD at the University of Auckland, he has written a book, spoken at over fifty events, appeared on radio, television, and magazines, which gave him enough experience to film a ten part documentary on sharks. Riley has raised over $200,000 to fund a satellite tagging program of Blue Sharks in New Zealand. The data collected has helped ban the practice known as shark finning. He has made his mark in Western Australia, by resuscitating a three meter tiger shark left for dead from a hook set by the drum-line culling program, and helped ban the WA shark cull. 

  • marnie olssen

    Marnie Olssen

    Shore operations
  • laura wells

     

    Laura Wells

    Team Member
  • jesse mcneilly

    Jesse McNeilly

    Team Member

    Fire and Safety advisor, Fire Protection Association of Australia Corporate Bronze Member, Fire Protection Accreditation Scheme,  Adv. Dip. Management, Dip. Health and Safety.

  • bengineer

    Bengineer

    Captain and Engineer
  • frances little

    Frances Little

    Scientific Collaborator

    Residing in Auckland, New Zealand, Frances is the International Director at Aukland University of Technology, where she also completed a Bachelor of Education. She accomplished a Graduate Diploma of Education Management at UNITEC, followed by the completion of the management and Leadership in Education program, at Harvard Graduate School of Education. Frances has devoted her time to education as a teacher, principal, and administrator for many years, in New Zealand, and the Cooks Islands. She has assisted Nan Hauser with whale necropsies on Mangaia, an island in the Cooks group, and continues to work with Nan. They are currently working to establish study abroad opportunities in Rarotonga, for university students from the US, Europe, and Asia.

  • erika but

    Erika Bult

    Team member
  • Byron Brown

    Byron Brown

    Team member

    Byron has been apart of the team since 2013 and studied ‘Marine Science’ at the University of New South Wales in Australia. His role has been assisting the team with the social media side and website updates as well as being apart of the crew.

South Pacific Whale Research Consortium

team members

CLICK ON THE NAME FOR BIOGRAPHY…

  • Screen shot 2012-06-13 at 4.58.31 PM

    Nan Hauser

    President CCRC
    SPWRC Exec. Committee

    Nan Hauser is the President and Director of the Center for Cetacean Research and Conservation. She resides in Rarotonga, Cook Islands, where she researches population identity, population abundance, acoustics, genetics, behavior, migration and navigation of cetaceans. She is a Trustee for Save Our Oceans Charitable Trust in Rarotonga. She satellite tags whales to gather information on their migration over long distances. She has taught on a global level for the Dolphin Research Center, Whale Conservation Institute (now Ocean Alliance), The New England Dolphin Outreach Project, Cook Islands Whale Research Project and other non-profit organizations. As a registered nurse, Nan practices and teaches medicine on the outer islands of the Cooks, where she also teaches in the local schools. She holds a US Coastguard 100 tonne Captain’s license. Nan serves on the Executive Committee, and is a scientific researcher for the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium. She played a major role in the creation of a 2 million square kilometer whale sanctuary in the EEZ of the Cook Islands, and built a whale education center (now known as the “Whale & Wildlife Centre”) in Rarotonga. In the U.S., she has served on the Board of the Gulf of Maine Aquarium. Nan has been the focus of many Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, National Geographic, ARTE, and Smithsonian films. She received a “Lifetime Achievement Award” in NYC along with Sylvia Earle of Mission Blue and Khalid bin Sultan of Living Oceans in November of 2014. 

  • scott-baker-160x160

    Scott Baker

    SPWRC

    Scott Baker is a Professor and Associate Director at the college of agricultural sciences, at Oregon State University. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Environmental Studies, which he acquired at the New College of the University of South Florida in 1977, and a Ph.D in Zoology from the University of Hawaii, in 1985. In the past he has taught and done research at the Smithsonian Institute, the Laboratory of Genomic Diversity at the United States National Cancer Institute, Victoria University, the University of Hawaii, and the University of Auckland. In 2001, he was awarded a Science & Technology Medal in recognition of his work on conservation genetics. Scott’s research and teachings are related to molecular and demographic forces that influence the diversity and allocation of natural populations, particularly endangered or valuable species. Scott is a member of the American Genetic Association, the Society for Marine Mammal Science, and the Cetacean Specialist Group, IUCN. He is an Editor for the Journal of Heredity, which is the official journal of the genetics society. Scott was also the New Zealand delegate to the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling commission.

  •  

    Phillip Clapham

    Vice president 
    SPWRC Exec. Committee

    Cornish by birth, Phillip Clapham accompanied a girlfriend to the U.S in 1980, stumbled into whale biology, and is presently acknowledged as one of the world’s leading experts on large whales. Having more than a quarter century of experience with cetaceans, Phil also holds a PhD in zoology from the university of Aberdeen in Scotland. He has worked at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, and directed a long-term study of individual humpback whales, at the center for Coastal Studies in Massachusetts. He now directs research at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Washington, where he has advised many governments on whale reasearch and conservation. Currently he directs a program of large whale research and advises the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service, on science and conservation both locally and internationally. He is an advisor to many Masters and PhD students, including Nan Hauser. He edits for three scientific journals; Marine Mammal Science, Mammal Review, and the Royal Society’s Biology Letters. He is a member of the U.S. Delegation to the International Whaling Commission’s Scientific Committee. Phil has published four books, and one hundred peer-reviewed papers about whales and other cetaceans.

  • Rochelle Constantine

    SPWRC Consortium Office

    Rochelle’s interests are in applied behavioural ecology, in particular, the effects of tourism on dolphin behaviour and conservation of large whale populations. Her research has been primarily concentrated on the population size, home range, habitat use and effects of swim-with and dolphin-watching tourism on bottlenose dolphin population using the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. This study was initiated in late 1993. She is now focusing the research on testing hypotheses about social group structure, and its role in spatio-temporal changes in habitat use, in the Bay of Islands and Hauraki Gulf. Rochelle will be continuing a long-term study on the impacts of tourism on bottlenose dolphin behaviour, by examining the effectiveness of permit changes to the dolphins’ responses to swimmers and boats. Since 1995, she has been studying the humpback whales throughout the South Pacific (in particular Tonga and New Zealand)in collaboration with Professor Scott Baker, and the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium. More recently, her interests and studies have expanded to include research on Bryde’s whales in the Auckland and Northland regions; part of a long-term project based at the University of Auckland. also since 1995. They are using GIS (ArcView) and photo-identification to determine the ranging patterns of these non-migratory whales, and collecting skin samples to determine the molecular ecology of this whale population that ranges around northern New Zealand. Most of this research relies on collaborations with a number of scientists (both in New Zealand and overseas), government agencies, tour operators and non-government organisations.


      
  • David-Paton-160x160

    David Paton

    SPWRC

    David is an Adjunct Associate Professor, at Southern Cross University, and is attached ti the Southern Cross Center for Whale Research. Before establishing the Center, David worked for more than 20 years for many different nature conservation agencies, including Queensland Marine Parks on the Great Barrier Reef, and Nre South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service, where he was the Senior Manager. David has been conducting research on whales and dolphins since the 1980’s, and his research has taken him throughout Australia, and to a range of countries in the South Pacific, including Tonga, and Samoa. His research has also taken him to Hawaii, America, North USA, Canada, and Antarctica . David is currently co-ordinating several projects, including monitoring the recovery of the eastern Australian humpback whale population, at Cape Byron. In 2001, David co-ordinated the very first whale and dolphin study of its kind to be undertaken in Samoa, with extensive involvement from local government agencies, and non-government organizations.

  • Michael Noad

    Acoustician, SPWRC
  • Claire

    Claire Garrigue

    SPWRC

    Claire is an honorary research fellow at the School of Biological Sciences in Auckland University, Laboratory of Ecology and Evolution, where she studies the genetic structure of the humpback whales in New Caledonia. Claire has lived in the south pacific since 1983, and has been a marine biologist at IRD (Institut pour la Recherche et le Développement) since 1989. She has been involved in programs in which she studied the benthic ecosystem of coral areas in Noumea. Claire is the founder and scientific advisor of Opération Cétacés, an NGO created in 1994, and she has created a research program on marine mammals in New Caledonia. Every year she manages a three month field program that consists of four or five field assistants. Claire has represented New Caldonia at the IWC in 2000, and at the SPREP meeting in Apia in 2001. She has also done marine mammal research in Hawaii in 1996, and Canada in 1993. Because Claire is so passionate and dedicated, she creates projects to educate children and whale watchers about the conservation of marine mammals, and has written a book on the humpback whales in New Caledonia.

  • Michael

    Michael Donoghue

    SPWRC Exec. Committee

    Mike is a senior international Relations Officer with the New Zealand Department of Conservation, and a Board member of the Marine Conservation Action Fund. He has an M.Sc. in Oceanography from Southampton University, and is the Scientific Advisor to New Zealand’s Commissioner of the International Whaling Commission. Before joining DOC, Mike was a self-employed longline fisherman for eight years in the Hauraki Gulf by Auckland.  He has published many articles on the interactions between marine mammals and fisheries in New Zealand, and has provided policy advice on conservation and protection of endemic New Zealand marine mammals to the Ministers of Conservation, since 1987. He was mainly responsible for establishing the Conservation Services Levies program in New Zealand, through which fisherman pay the costs of research and projects, to avoid, and reduce the negative impacts of commercial fishing on marine protected species. As well as leading a humpback whale research program in Tonga, Mike coordinates the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium activities, which brings together biologists studying whales in eastern Australia, New Caledonia, Tonga, the Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Chile and Columbia. He has also assisted the governments of the Cook Islands and Samoa with drafting the legislation that establishes whale sanctuaries in their waters, and attended the 2001 Regional Forum to develop a South Pacific Whale Sanctuary.

  • mikepbio copy

    Michael Poole

    SPWRC Exec. Committee

    Dr. Michael Poole is the Director of The Marine Mammal Research Program at the Island Research Center & Environmental Observatory (CRIOBE, a biological research station of the University of Perpignan, France) in Moorea, French Polynesia. He is a charter member of the Society for Marine Mammalogy, and a member of the American Society of Mammalogists. For fifteen years, most of Michael’s research has been focused on spinner dolphin’s native to French Polynesia, but he has studied humpback whales, rough-toothed dolphins, and several other species on eight different islands. Michael has provided reports on his research, to the Unites Nations Cetacean Specialist Group of South Pacific Regional Environmental Program. Dr. Poole’s most profound success came about in May 2002, when after ten years, French Polynesia’s government accepted his long-standing proposition, and draft legislation to create a whale and dolphin sanctuary, within all of the territory’s Exclusive Economic Zone, which is an area half the size of the USA.

  • anonymous

    Sue Taei

    SPWRC, Exec. Committee

Board of Directors

team members
  • Screen shot 2012-06-13 at 4.58.31 PM

    Nan Hauser

    President CCRC
    SPWRC Exec. Committee

    Nan Hauser is the President and Director of the Center for Cetacean Research and Conservation. She resides in Rarotonga, Cook Islands, where she researches population identity, population abundance, acoustics, genetics, behavior, migration and navigation of cetaceans. She is a Trustee for Save Our Oceans Charitable Trust in Rarotonga. She satellite tags whales to gather information on their migration over long distances. She has taught on a global level for the Dolphin Research Center, Whale Conservation Institute (now Ocean Alliance), The New England Dolphin Outreach Project, Cook Islands Whale Research Project and other non-profit organizations. As a registered nurse, Nan practices and teaches medicine on the outer islands of the Cooks, where she also teaches in the local schools. She holds a US Coastguard 100 tonne Captain’s license. Nan serves on the Executive Committee, and is a scientific researcher for the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium. She played a major role in the creation of a 2 million square kilometer whale sanctuary in the EEZ of the Cook Islands, and built a whale education center (now known as the “Whale & Wildlife Centre”) in Rarotonga. In the U.S., she has served on the Board of the Gulf of Maine Aquarium. Nan has been the focus of many Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, National Geographic, ARTE, and Smithsonian films. She received a “Lifetime Achievement Award” in NYC along with Sylvia Earle of Mission Blue and Khalid bin Sultan of Living Oceans in November of 2014. 

  • Phillip-Clapham-160x160

    Phillip Clapham

    Vice president 
    SPWRC Exec. Committee

    Cornish by birth, Phillip Clapham accompanied a girlfriend to the U.S in 1980, stumbled into whale biology, and is presently acknowledged as one of the world’s leading experts on large whales. Having more than a quarter century of experience with cetaceans, Phil also holds a PhD in zoology from the university of Aberdeen in Scotland. He has worked at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, and directed a long-term study of individual humpback whales, at the center for Coastal Studies in Massachusetts. He now directs research at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Washington, where he has advised many governments on whale reasearch and conservation. Currently he directs a program of large whale research and advises the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service, on science and conservation both locally and internationally. He is an advisor to many Masters and PhD students, including Nan Hauser. He edits for three scientific journals; Marine Mammal Science, Mammal Review, and the Royal Society’s Biology Letters. He is a member of the U.S. Delegation to the International Whaling Commission’s Scientific Committee. Phil has published four books, and one hundred peer-reviewed papers about whales and other cetaceans.

  • Michael

    Michael Donoghue

    SPWRC Exec. Committee

    Mike is a senior international Relations Officer with the New Zealand Department of Conservation, and a Board member of the Marine Conservation Action Fund. He has an M.Sc. in Oceanography from Southampton University, and is the Scientific Advisor to New Zealand’s Commissioner of the International Whaling Commission. Before joining DOC, Mike was a self-employed longline fisherman for eight years in the Hauraki Gulf by Auckland.  He has published many articles on the interactions between marine mammals and fisheries in New Zealand, and has provided policy advice on conservation and protection of endemic New Zealand marine mammals to the Ministers of Conservation, since 1987. He was mainly responsible for establishing the Conservation Services Levies program in New Zealand, through which fisherman pay the costs of research and projects, to avoid, and reduce the negative impacts of commercial fishing on marine protected species. As well as leading a humpback whale research program in Tonga, Mike coordinates the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium activities, which brings together biologists studying whales in eastern Australia, New Caledonia, Tonga, the Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Chile and Columbia. He has also assisted the governments of the Cook Islands and Samoa with drafting the legislation that establishes whale sanctuaries in their waters, and attended the 2001 Regional Forum to develop a South Pacific Whale Sanctuary.

  • Weld Butler

    Board Member

    Weld Butler serves as Principal and Senior Advisor at Harbor Advisory in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Weld has over 20 years of experience providing families with investment services, estate planning expertise and counsel on wealth related financial decisions. 

    After graduating from Colby College with a B.A in economics, Weld made an early lifestyle choice and moved out west to follow his passion for skiing. To support his lifestyle, he spent a number of years selling real estate near Jackson Hole, Wyoming. In 1984, Weld decided to return to New England to work at his father’s investment firm. Weld’s father, Robert G. Butler founded Harbor Advisory, an independent wealth management firm in 1972. At his father’s request, he first attended the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. 

    Weld is an avid outdoorsman and mountain climber. He’s climbed Mount Chimborazo in Ecuador as well as a number of other Andean Peaks. In good weather, Weld has been known to kayak to work. He currently resides with his wife, Sarah, and two sons in Eliot, Maine.  

  • Pete Paine

    Board member
    As a graduate of University of Southern California, accumulated 35 years of industry leadership in Government & Commercial Sectors. Background includes Management roles at Defense Contractors & Executive roles at Defense Subcontractors & IT Services Companies. As Data Capital Corporation’s Co-founder, CEO & Chairman built successful relationships with NASA/JPL spanning over 2 decades. As a Supercomputing OEM channel partner, launched offshore operating units the Middle East & United Kingdom. Strengths include company leadership, cost management & profit generation.
  • Christine Greene

    Board member
     
  • Marjolein

    Marjolein Duermeijer

    SPWRC Board member

    Marjolein obtained her master’s degree in Social Psychology at the University of Amsterdam, which she used travelling all over the world as a journalist. In January 2002, she began working for NCF as a researcher, and program developer which allowed her to work on all aspects of the productions. Since then, she has worked on films, such as the African King, Mountains of Eden, a two part series for National Geographic and Canal, Foorprints on the Water for Animal Planet, AVRO and ZDF. In 2007, Marjolein won a Roscar award for the film, Elephant, return to the Wild.

  • Tap Pryor

    Board member

    Tap graduated from Cornell University in 1954, then proceeded to join the U.S Marine Corps as a naval aviator, serving in Parris Island, Quantico, Pensacola, and MCAS Kanehoe, Hawaii. He attended graduate school in 1957 studying marine biology univer of hawaii until 61 then founded ocean institue, sea life park and the Makai undersea test range (now Makai Ocean Engineering). Tap was elected Senator of Hawaii in 1965, and served as chairman on the Committee for Agriculture, Forestry and Conservation. At age 35 President Johnson named him one of 11 commissioners to the President’s Commission of Marine Science, Marine Engineering and Marine Conservation. in 1968 Tap and Gosta Fahlman developed Aegir, an undersea habitat that fit 6 people. In the same year, they developed the first Plexiglas Submersible, which was tested off Makapuu Pt., along with Aegir. Pryor and Fahlman also invented Star II, a diver operated pontoon platform for launching and recovering Submersibles so they could operate in all weather. Star II logged more undersea work than any Submersible in the world. In 1968, Tap was named salesman of the year, by Hawaii, in recognition of his promotion of the state, and a place for Marine Science and Engineering Development. He created and operated the systemculture seafood plantation at Kahuku on Oahu, principally the production of feeding oysters. His product, the hawaiian oyster, was named the Outstanding New Product introduced to Europe in 1981, by the Cologne Food Fair. Soon after, he joined the Aquanatics Corp, then a NYSE-listed company as VP of research. In 1989 he moved to the Cook Islands and joined the office of the prime minister as director of the special projects division, and later was the media director and deputy chief of staff.

  • Felicity Robinson

    Board member 
  • travis and darren

    Darren Robinson

    Board member 
  • Erika Bult

    Board member 
  • hutch

    Ann and Bob Hutchins

    Board members 

    “Living in Coastal Maine surrounded by natural beauty provides a creative climate full of history and colorful opportunities for the eye of the artist and the camera lens. I have always loved the challenge of presenting my view of the world in a new and unusual way.”

    -Anne B. Hutchins-

    “Memories are preserved, emotions are stirred.”

    http://mainemadephotos.com

  • IMG_9952

    Jojo Heather

    Board member 

     

  • IMG_7745

    Laura Wells

    Board member 
  • jesse mcneilly

    Jesse McNeilly

    Board member

    Fire and Safety advisor, Fire Protection Association of Australia Corporate Bronze Member, Fire Protection Accreditation Scheme,  Adv. Dip. Management, Dip. Health and Safety.

  • bernard fouke

    Bernard Fouke

    Board member
  • John dyer

    John Dyer

    Board member

    John Dyer is the current founder and patron of the Ajubatus Foundation with a great understating of our wildlife and the preservation of endangered species. As a businessman, philanthropist and avid conservationist, John is passionate about the African wilderness and the need to conserve this global heritage. From an extensive corporate background (he was the MD of one of De Beers offshore subsidiaries at age of 29) that saw sojourns in London, Ireland and the Isle Man, John’s mind was never far from the wilderness and Africa. His 10 years as Chairman of Ulusaba Private Game Reserve is testament to his need to conserve our natural heritage. As chairman of the Ajubatus Group of companies, John has focused his time and energy on the Ajubatus Foundation and works in conjunction with leading veterinarians, scientist and academics. He has committed profits from his published works to furtherance of good scientific research. If not found wondering in the wilds, John revels in quiet time at his holiday home on the Isle of Man.

  • anonymous

     

    Susan Ronn

    Board member